Nobody wants to say goodbye to their pet.

The Australian Animal Poisons Helpline is here for pet parents in their greatest time of need.

We need your support more than ever to continue saving the lives of poisoned animals.

Help save the life of a poisoned pet

The Helpline requires urgent support. We need your help to keep us online so we can provide FREE, rapid pet poison information to the next anxious pet parent.

Give a lifeline to a poisoned pet by donating today.

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Who we’ve helped

SELF-MEDICATING
MONDO

Mondo, a 2-year old Pug, got into a packet of Nurofen after his owners inadvertently knocked it onto the floor. When they returned home, the packet had been chewed up and 4 tablets were missing. Over that evening, Mondo had multiple vomits and was off his food.

Nurofen contains an anti-inflammatory known as ibuprofen. Whilst ibuprofen is used safely in humans, even single doses in dogs can cause stomach ulcers and kidney damage.

As Mondo potentially had a large dose of ibuprofen and was unwell, he required an immediate assessment by a veterinarian. He was treated with some medications to stop his vomiting and prevent stomach ulcers, and some intravenous fluids to help reduce the risk of kidney damage.

Fortunately, with treatment Mondo’s symptoms rapidly improved. His kidney function remained normal and he was able to go home the following day. The Nurofen was kept up on a high shelf forever after.

SELF-MEDICATING
MONDO

Mondo, a 2-year old Pug, got into a packet of Nurofen after his owners inadvertently knocked it onto the floor. When they returned home, the packet had been chewed up and 4 tablets were missing. Over that evening, Mondo had multiple vomits and was off his food.

Nurofen contains an anti-inflammatory known as ibuprofen. Whilst ibuprofen is used safely in humans, even single doses in dogs can cause stomach ulcers and kidney damage.

As Mondo potentially had a large dose of ibuprofen and was unwell, he required an immediate assessment by a veterinarian. He was treated with some medications to stop his vomiting and prevent stomach ulcers, and some intravenous fluids to help reduce the risk of kidney damage.

Fortunately, with treatment Mondo’s symptoms rapidly improved. His kidney function remained normal and he was able to go home the following day. The Nurofen was kept up on a high shelf forever after.

How do WE help?

As a registered Australian charity our purposes are to:
Reduce harm and deaths associated with animal poisonings by providing a FREE animal poisons helpline for all pet owners in Australia and New Zealand

Promote poisoning prevention in animals

Increase public awareness surrounding animal poisoning

Identify poisoning trends and feed this information back to relevant regulatory and professional bodies

Support research activities that prevent and improve outcomes for poisoned animals

How can YOU help?

Save a pet’s life by supporting a free helpline for all pet owners by leaving a gift above.

Spread the word! Talk to your animal loving peers, inform your local vet, follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter and share our posts with your family, friends and animal related pages that you follow.

Promote us in your space if you work in a pet store, a vet clinic or for an animal welfare organisation. Request your free promotional materials.

If your business operates in the pet product or services markets, please consider partnering with us as a Sponsor. Request a Sponsorship Prospectus.

Got an idea? Let us know. We love working with like-minded people

We require urgent support to meet the demands of a hazardous Summer

News

  • Our Win a Doggy Bag of Goodies from the Australian Animal Poisons Helpline Competition is officially open! The Australian Animal Poisons Helpline is giving you the chance...

  • National Pet Poisons Prevention Month is here, and to contribute to this important initiative we will be sharing a series of informative posts on five common poisons. ...

  • You may have heard that grapes are toxic to dogs, and yes, we can confirm that grapes, raisins, and sultanas are all bad for your pooch. Whether they are black, red, or green...

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