PAPP BAITS

papp-baits

PAPP BAITS

papp-baits

The Animal Poisons Helpline has recently handled several cases whereby pet dogs have accidentally been poisoned by para-aminopropiophenone (PAPP) baits. PAPP baits have been used in Australia since 2016 to control foxes, wild dogs and feral cats. They are available in a restricted manner as a variety of formulations including canid pest ejectors (spring loaded devices that are designed to propel PAPP directly into the mouth of target species), hard shell delivery vehicles (designed to insert into meat baits), pastes (to apply to leg traps) and standard meat baits.

PAPP reduces the ability of red blood cells to deliver oxygen to the body. When animals ingest these baits, signs of poisoning can develop rapidly. Early signs of poisoning include extreme lethargy, weakness, excessive panting at rest and discolouration of the lips, gums and tongue. Without timely veterinary care the prognosis for companion animals that are poisoned by PAPP is poor, with death reported in as little as 45 minutes following ingestion. Fortunately an antidote is available for PAPP poisoning and immediate veterinary treatment can be lifesaving.

PAPP baits are licensed for use in all states and territories of Australia. They are designed to be highly attractive to target species and are also attractive to pet dogs and cats. Preventing pets from ingesting these baits is therefore imperative. Please keep your pets leashed and in sight when walking in bushland and be vigilant for bait signage prior to entering these areas.

The Animal Poisons Helpline provides free advice to pet owners in Australia and New Zealand and can be reached on ☎️ 1300 869 738 (AU) or 0800 869 738 (NZ). If you don’t already follow the Animal Poisons Helpline Facebook Page, follow now to receive live animal poisons alerts and updates. If you are a member of a veterinary team in Australia or New Zealand, you can join the Animal Poisons Centre For Vets Facebook group which is regularly updated with toxicology tidbits and poisoning trends. We thank the Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development for supporting this post.