JADE PLANT

JADE PLANT

Crassula ovata, more commonly known as the jade plant, lucky plant or money plant, is a popular succulent recognised by its unique coin-shaped leaves, clusters of small pink or white flowers and its association with bringing good fortune and prosperity. Commonly grown as both an indoor and outdoor house plant in Australia and New Zealand, the Animal Poisons Helpline is frequently contacted after companion animals have ingested parts of this plant.

Animals that ingest small quantities of this plant can develop gastrointestinal signs such as vomiting, diarrhoea and reduced appetite. Occasionally other effects, such as lethargy and weakness, have been reported to the Animal Poisons Helpline following ingestion of this plant.

Plants belonging to the Kalanchoe and Cotyledon genus closely resemble jade plants and contain toxic compounds known as cardiac glycosides. Ingestions of these plants have the potential to result in significant poisoning and therefore correct identification of the plant is extremely important. In cases of uncertainty, it is best to contact the Helpline for additional guidance.

Whilst it is not necessary to remove this plant from the home, owners should try to keep jade plants out of reach or inquisitive pets. If your pet has ingested something they should not have, please phone the Animal Poisons Helpline for advice. The Animal Poisons Helpline provides free advice to pet owners in Australia and New Zealand and can be reached on 1300 869 738 (AU) or 0800 869 738 (NZ).