Compost And Your Dog

Compost And Your Dog

compost poisoning dogs🚨 *ALERT* 🚨
As the weather continues to warm up, we have noticed a significant increase in calls regarding pets ingesting compost. But did you know that your compost pile could be a serious hazard to your pet?
Some pets (particularly dogs) are attracted to compost. Dogs will often put a lot of effort into trying to access compost and will readily eat it if given the chance to do so. So, what is the risk?
Not only can compost contain certain discarded human food scraps which may be toxic to your pets, but it also encourages the growth of microorganisms that can result in serious complications when ingested.
Mould can flourish in compost, and some strains produce toxins that are potentially life-threatening to our pets if eaten. These toxins, known as tremorgenic mycotoxins, stimulate the central nervous system resulting in profound tremors and convulsions.
Clostridium botulinum is another microorganism that can grow in low oxygen environments such as compost. Ingestion of the botulinum toxin produced by these bacteria can result in a severe and persistent paralysis, known as Botulism. In its most severe form, botulism can cause paralysis of the respiratory muscles. Whilst botulism is rare, it is potentially life-threatening.
If you are the owner of a mischievous pet and a compost pile, you need to put measures in place to ensure they cannot eat the compost. Compost bins that are secured with locking mechanisms work great. Other options may include fencing off the area or restricting your pets’ access to that area of your garden. You should also avoid placing highly attractive food items into the compost, such as meat and dairy products.
Please help us raise the awareness of pet poisoning by sharing this post with any pet-owning gardeners you may know, or to any Facebook gardening groups you may belong to.
☎️ If your pet has ingested any compost, please call the Animal Poisons Helpline immediately on 1300 869 738 (AU) or 0800 869 738 (NZ) for advice, even if your pet looks well. Our service is free for all pet owners.
📧 For pet poison updates, sign up to our mailing list at animalpoisons.com.au/stay-up-to-date