Author: Animal Poisons Centre

Vitamin D3 can be extremely dangerous to dogs and cats when consumed in amounts greater than dietary recommendations. Excess Vitamin D causes an imbalance of calcium and phosphorus in the body leading to ...

As many households prepare their gardens for spring, we have noticed a significant increase in calls to the Animal Poisons Helpline regarding fertiliser ingestion. Fertilisers are available in a diverse range of formulations. ...

Spring bulbs are flowering strongly to brighten our days, nodding to us in the breeze that spring has arrived! Here’s what you should know about Spring bulb safety and your pet.Almost all plants that arise from bulbs or corms have the potential to be poisonous...

With many of our communities able to celebrate Father’s Day this weekend, we anticipate an increase in calls about the following hazards to pets. Check out the list, keep an eye out for them at home and keep your pet safe:  High fat foods (e.g.,...

Today we take time to remember all pets who have crossed the Rainbow Bridge. By thinking of them we honour the significance of their lives, the joy they brought and the love we shared.Many people have lost a pet from having been poisoned. We are...

Many dogs are tempted to play with asthma inhalers. They are often left on bedside tables or in bags on the floor. They are made of plastic, like many toys, and have saliva on them which makes them smell good. These inhalers are helpful for...

Can my pet get poisoned from eating a poisoned rat or mouse?This is a question we get asked a lot and the answer depends on the situation. If a rat or mouse has died from an anti-coagulant rodenticide (e.g. brodifacoum, bromadiolone, difenacoum, etc), it is...

An Antarctic cold air blast is causing our followers in the South to light their fireplaces to keep warm. It sounds like a simple enough activity, but one that might expose pets to a number of poisonous hazards. If you do have a fireplace, make...

The Animal Poisons Centre is often called about dogs and cats that have eaten medications and household items that can damage their kidneys. Some pets may develop life-long chronic kidney disease from such a once-off ingestion. Prevention is always best – check this list to...