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Anonymous User
RA
$20.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
SH
$23.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
WW
$10.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
MK
$25.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
RW
$10.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
KS
$10.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
KS
$10.00 October 14, 2021
Anonymous User
JH
$20.00 October 13, 2021
Anonymous User
TO
$10.00 October 13, 2021
Anonymous User
DB
$10.00 October 13, 2021
Anonymous User
CB
$23.00 October 13, 2021
Anonymous User
LO
$10.00 October 13, 2021

What we do

The Australian Animal Poisons Helpline provides rapid up-to-date first-aid advice, risk assessment and triage recommendations to pet owners who may be with a poisoned animal.

We have supported more than 8,000 pet owners over the last 12 months, and it is due to an increased demand for our services that the Helpline requires urgent support from passionate animal lovers like you to continue to provide our vital service at no cost.

Our service must remain free for all Australians and New Zealanders, so that, regardless of their situation, concerned pet owners can seek essential advice for their pet without hesitation. Your gift today could save a best friend’s life tomorrow, and a lifetime of wondering “what if I just called…” for someone like yourself.

Every pet owner experiences the anxiety of finding their beloved pet eating or getting into something they shouldn’t have. It is in these moments that we provide FREE advice to pet parents across the country to calm their worries and deliver lifesaving advice.

The Helpline is staffed by poisons specialists and specialist veterinarians. All clinical staff have in-depth knowledge and experience in managing poisoned animals, meaning you’ll get the most up-to-date advice at a moment’s notice.

Who we’ve helped

SELF-MEDICATING
MONDO

Mondo, a 2-year old Pug, got into a packet of Nurofen after his owners inadvertently knocked it onto the floor. When they returned home, the packet had been chewed up and 4 tablets were missing. Over that evening, Mondo had multiple vomits and was off his food.

 

Nurofen contains an anti-inflammatory known as ibuprofen. Whilst ibuprofen is used safely in humans, even single doses in dogs can cause stomach ulcers and kidney damage.

 

As Mondo potentially had a large dose of ibuprofen and was unwell, he required an immediate assessment by a veterinarian. He was treated with some medications to stop his vomiting and prevent stomach ulcers, and some intravenous fluids to help reduce the risk of kidney damage.

 

Fortunately, with treatment Mondo’s symptoms rapidly improved. His kidney function remained normal and he was able to go home the following day. The Nurofen was kept up on a high shelf forever after.

Dog-Sitting
Turns Sour

Seven year old Mishka had clued on to what was about to happen. All the warning signs were on display. The suitcases were out and her owners had packed her lead and water bowl into a plastic bag. They were off again…

After being dropped off to a family friend, Mishka spent her first night exploring her temporary home and making herself comfortable. Her temporary owner left early in the morning for work and whilst she was a little anxious at first, inquisitive Mishka started hunting around for something to do or eat. Unfortunately as she nudged the laundry door open, her eyes caught a new packet of Yates Blitzem snail pellets.

Several hours later her minder arrived home to find Mishka convulsing on the laundry floor. Next to her was the now empty packet of metaldehyde containing snail pellets. Metaldehyde toxicity can result in seizures and liver toxicity, and large ingestions such as this can be fatal.

Now panicked and scared, her minder rushed Mishka to her closest vet, but in her worried state forgot to take the empty box of Yates Blitzem snail pellets along with her.

Mishka’s vet promptly contacted the Animal Poisons Centre and metaldehyde was identified as the offending agent. Mishka received appropriate treatment to control her seizures and also help protect her now troubled liver. Three days later, Mishka returned home to her very lucky owners.

Tremulous
Tinky

Tinky, the 7-year-old Tabby cat was found licking her paws after walking over bricks that had just been sprayed with an ant-killer known as Biflex. Tinky was already drooling when her owner contacted the Animal Poisons Centre 15 minutes later.
Biflex contains bifenthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. Cat’s are particularly sensitive to pyrethroids and even small ingestions can result in excessive salivation, body tremors and even convulsions.

We recommended that the Biflex residue be rinsed off Tinky’s paws with a mild soap and water and that she be taken to a veterinarian immediately. Tinky developed facial and then general body tremor at the veterinarian practice 3 hours later. Unfortunately, she then had a generalised convulsion which lasted less than 1 minute.

The veterinarian consulted the Animal Poisons Centre. As Tinky was showing clear signs of pyrethroid poisoning, it was recommended that Tinky be treated with some medication to prevent further convulsions, be admitted for a minimum of 24 hours and otherwise managed supportively. Tinky was without symptoms 2 days later and was sent home.

Heading into the warmer months, this is a timely reminder to cat owners to be cautious with pyrethroid insecticides. Cats can become poisoned from exposure to very small amounts. Pyrethroids are commonly found in domestic insecticides such as fly sprays and outdoor granular and spray products. If you have a cat and are considering using these, ensure they are kept away from the area until it has been well ventilated and the surfaces are thoroughly dry.

Paw
Jezabelle

Jezabelle, a 2-year old Burmese cat was found licking her paws after walking through garden weeds that had just been sprayed with Roundup. Whilst she appeared well, her owner contacted the Animal Poisons Centre in concern.
Roundup contains a non-selective herbicide known as glyphosate. Ingestion of the concentrate, or larger ingestions of the dilute product can cause poisoning. Symptoms can include vomiting, increased acidity of the blood, electrolyte changes and kidney and liver damage. Fortunately, the glyphosate that Jezabelle walked through was dilute and at most she had only managed to lick a few drops off her paws.

The Animal Poisons Centre recommended that the glyphosate residue be rinsed off her paws with a mild soap and water, and that she be offered a drink of water or something to eat. As she had been exposed to a small amount of diluted Roundup, it was deemed safe to observe at home. On follow-up the next day, Jezabelle remained completely well.

Ratsak
Ronald

Living with his owner on a rural property in Goulburn was a Border Collie named Ronald. Ronald, an especially energetic 1-year-old who was already well known for his ability to destroy new shoes and furniture legs, was always on the lookout for new opportunities. It didn’t take long for Ronald the exhaust the available shoes and unfortunately, on the second Monday of May he chewed through a near new box of Ratsak Fast Action pellets containing a rodenticide called brodifacoum. The pellets were nowhere to be seen, however some green residue was noted in Ronald’s mouth which was all the evidence the owner needed. A quick call to the Animal Poisons Centre confirmed that this could be a problem.

Most domestic rat and mouse baits in Australia, such as Talon, Ratsak and The Big Cheese contain an anticoagulant. These can stop the blood from clotting and result in bleeding which can be life-threatening.

The Animal Poisons Centre recommended to take Ronald to the vet immediately. In the meantime they also notified the local vet with the product details. Fortunately for Ronald, the vet induced vomiting and administered the required antidote. Ronald made a remarkable recovery after four weeks of treatment.

The Great
Escape

Houdini lived up to his name. Whilst his owner was out shopping, he managed to escape his cage once again. He used the doggy door to get into the house, hopped up the steps and down the hallway into the master bedroom. He then set his eyes on his owners box of very expensive Christian Louboutin shoes. Luckily for his owner, Houdini decided not to nibble on the heels but rather feast on the small sachet of silica gel contained within the shoe box.
Having arrived home, Houdini’s owner was initially relieved to see that her outrageously expensive shoes were still intact. However, on closer inspection noticed that the sachet of silica gel was now mostly missing. Frightened and concerned at possible consequences for her little rabbit, she called the Animal Poisons Centre.

Much to her relief the owner was provided reassurance that no harm would come from silica gel. Houdini would live to see another day, and as such be given another opportunity to nibble on some fancy shoes.

Who we’ve helped

SELF-MEDICATING
MONDO

Mondo, a 2-year old Pug, got into a packet of Nurofen after his owners inadvertently knocked it onto the floor. When they returned home, the packet had been chewed up and 4 tablets were missing. Over that evening, Mondo had multiple vomits and was off his food.

Nurofen contains an anti-inflammatory known as ibuprofen. Whilst ibuprofen is used safely in humans, even single doses in dogs can cause stomach ulcers and kidney damage.

As Mondo potentially had a large dose of ibuprofen and was unwell, he required an immediate assessment by a veterinarian. He was treated with some medications to stop his vomiting and prevent stomach ulcers, and some intravenous fluids to help reduce the risk of kidney damage.

Fortunately, with treatment Mondo’s symptoms rapidly improved. His kidney function remained normal and he was able to go home the following day. The Nurofen was kept up on a high shelf forever after.

Dog-Sitting
Turns Sour

Seven year old Mishka had clued on to what was about to happen. All the warning signs were on display. The suitcases were out and her owners had packed her lead and water bowl into a plastic bag. They were off again…

After being dropped off to a family friend, Mishka spent her first night exploring her temporary home and making herself comfortable. Her temporary owner left early in the morning for work and whilst she was a little anxious at first, inquisitive Mishka started hunting around for something to do or eat. Unfortunately as she nudged the laundry door open, her eyes caught a new packet of Yates Blitzem snail pellets.

Several hours later her minder arrived home to find Mishka convulsing on the laundry floor. Next to her was the now empty packet of metaldehyde containing snail pellets. Metaldehyde toxicity can result in seizures and liver toxicity, and large ingestions such as this can be fatal.

Now panicked and scared, her minder rushed Mishka to her closest vet, but in her worried state forgot to take the empty box of Yates Blitzem snail pellets along with her.

Mishka’s vet promptly contacted the Animal Poisons Centre and metaldehyde was identified as the offending agent. Mishka received appropriate treatment to control her seizures and also help protect her now troubled liver. Three days later, Mishka returned home to her very lucky owners.

Tremulous
Tinky

Tinky, the 7-year-old Tabby cat was found licking her paws after walking over bricks that had just been sprayed with an ant-killer known as Biflex. Tinky was already drooling when her owner contacted the Animal Poisons Centre 15 minutes later.
Biflex contains bifenthrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. Cat’s are particularly sensitive to pyrethroids and even small ingestions can result in excessive salivation, body tremors and even convulsions.

We recommended that the Biflex residue be rinsed off Tinky’s paws with a mild soap and water and that she be taken to a veterinarian immediately. Tinky developed facial and then general body tremor at the veterinarian practice 3 hours later. Unfortunately, she then had a generalised convulsion which lasted less than 1 minute.

The veterinarian consulted the Animal Poisons Centre. As Tinky was showing clear signs of pyrethroid poisoning, it was recommended that Tinky be treated with some medication to prevent further convulsions, be admitted for a minimum of 24 hours and otherwise managed supportively. Tinky was without symptoms 2 days later and was sent home.

Heading into the warmer months, this is a timely reminder to cat owners to be cautious with pyrethroid insecticides. Cats can become poisoned from exposure to very small amounts. Pyrethroids are commonly found in domestic insecticides such as fly sprays and outdoor granular and spray products. If you have a cat and are considering using these, ensure they are kept away from the area until it has been well ventilated and the surfaces are thoroughly dry.

Paw
Jezabelle

Jezabelle, a 2-year old Burmese cat was found licking her paws after walking through garden weeds that had just been sprayed with Roundup. Whilst she appeared well, her owner contacted the Animal Poisons Centre in concern.
Roundup contains a non-selective herbicide known as glyphosate. Ingestion of the concentrate, or larger ingestions of the dilute product can cause poisoning. Symptoms can include vomiting, increased acidity of the blood, electrolyte changes and kidney and liver damage. Fortunately, the glyphosate that Jezabelle walked through was dilute and at most she had only managed to lick a few drops off her paws.

The Animal Poisons Centre recommended that the glyphosate residue be rinsed off her paws with a mild soap and water, and that she be offered a drink of water or something to eat. As she had been exposed to a small amount of diluted Roundup, it was deemed safe to observe at home. On follow-up the next day, Jezabelle remained completely well.

Ratsak
Ronald

Living with his owner on a rural property in Goulburn was a Border Collie named Ronald. Ronald, an especially energetic 1-year-old who was already well known for his ability to destroy new shoes and furniture legs, was always on the lookout for new opportunities. It didn’t take long for Ronald the exhaust the available shoes and unfortunately, on the second Monday of May he chewed through a near new box of Ratsak Fast Action pellets containing a rodenticide called brodifacoum. The pellets were nowhere to be seen, however some green residue was noted in Ronald’s mouth which was all the evidence the owner needed. A quick call to the Animal Poisons Centre confirmed that this could be a problem.

Most domestic rat and mouse baits in Australia, such as Talon, Ratsak and The Big Cheese contain an anticoagulant. These can stop the blood from clotting and result in bleeding which can be life-threatening.

The Animal Poisons Centre recommended to take Ronald to the vet immediately. In the meantime they also notified the local vet with the product details. Fortunately for Ronald, the vet induced vomiting and administered the required antidote. Ronald made a remarkable recovery after four weeks of treatment.

The Great
Escape

Houdini lived up to his name. Whilst his owner was out shopping, he managed to escape his cage once again. He used the doggy door to get into the house, hopped up the steps and down the hallway into the master bedroom. He then set his eyes on his owners box of very expensive Christian Louboutin shoes. Luckily for his owner, Houdini decided not to nibble on the heels but rather feast on the small sachet of silica gel contained within the shoe box.
Having arrived home, Houdini’s owner was initially relieved to see that her outrageously expensive shoes were still intact. However, on closer inspection noticed that the sachet of silica gel was now mostly missing. Frightened and concerned at possible consequences for her little rabbit, she called the Animal Poisons Centre.

Much to her relief the owner was provided reassurance that no harm would come from silica gel. Houdini would live to see another day, and as such be given another opportunity to nibble on some fancy shoes.

How do WE help?

As a registered Australian charity our purposes are to:
Reduce harm and deaths associated with animal poisonings by providing a FREE animal poisons helpline for all pet owners in Australia and New Zealand

Promote poisoning prevention in animals

Increase public awareness surrounding animal poisoning

Identify poisoning trends and feed this information back to relevant regulatory and professional bodies

Support research activities that prevent and improve outcomes for poisoned animals

How can YOU help?

Save a pet’s life by supporting a free helpline for all pet owners by leaving a gift above.

Spread the word! Talk to your animal loving peers, inform your local vet, follow us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter and share our posts with your family, friends and animal related pages that you follow.

Promote us in your space if you work in a pet store, a vet clinic or for an animal welfare organisation. Request your free promotional materials.

If your business operates in the pet product or services markets, please consider partnering with us as a Sponsor. Request a Sponsorship Prospectus.

Got an idea? Let us know. We love working with like-minded people

We require urgent support to meet the demands of a hazardous Autumn

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